Post Reply 
 
Thread Rating:
  • 1 Vote(s) - 4 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Bloody English
12-11-2004, 08:10 AM
Post: #1
Bloody English

As in English language. How on earth do we manage to learn all its stupid variations?

For instance - my lad was reading to me and wasn't sure about y-o-u-n-g. When he got it he said 'o - u is a silent o then'. But then thinking about it, o-u can be just about anything! as in

u.......(young)
aw......(bought)
o........(cough)
oo.......(you)
oh.......(dough)

which does make me wonder how do the kiddies learn it and how do foreign students learn it. And how did I ever learn it?

What Are Your Views On Forum Moderation?[Image: hatter.jpg]
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
12-11-2004, 09:37 AM
Post: #2
Bloody English
That's why English is considered one of the hardest languages in the world to learn. Huh Smile

"You cannot teach people anything. You can only help them discover it within themselves."
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
12-11-2004, 01:47 PM
Post: #3
Bloody English
My son is currently trying to learn how to read and write. (He's in Year 1)
They use a system called "The Jolly Phonics" which basically means learning the sound of the word by connecting it with an action. Over time the action disappears and the child just remembers the sound.
Later comes the "name" of the letter, ie how we say the alpabet as adults.

It's actually quite a good system as my son has really picked it up well in the last two years.

I'm trying for the life of me to remember the "ou" sound, but I can't remember it.
If there are any words that don't have a theme to them, they call them "tricky words" and just learn them independantly.
Which I guess in the English language there must be alot of tricky words:laugh:
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
12-11-2004, 06:29 PM
Post: #4
Bloody English
Andrea Wrote:My son is currently trying to learn how to read and write. (He's in Year 1)
They use a system called "The Jolly Phonics" which basically means learning the sound of the word by connecting it with an action. Over time the action disappears and the child just remembers the sound.
Later comes the "name" of the letter, ie how we say the alpabet as adults.

It's actually quite a good system as my son has really picked it up well in the last two years.

I'm trying for the life of me to remember the "ou" sound, but I can't remember it.
If there are any words that don't have a theme to them, they call them "tricky words" and just learn them independantly.
Which I guess in the English language there must be alot of tricky words:laugh:

We done that last year Andera, when Katie was in Primary 1 (same as Year 1), and it was really funny seeing them doing their actions with the sounds. I can't remember how we remembered the sounds, but whatever it was worked.

I do agree with the language being very hard, taken now from the point of view of helping Katie with her homework as if there is a word she hasn't seen before she does what is called blending the letters to get the word, but this can be difficult with words such as young or friends etc. However, their wee brains are like sponges at the moment as she is also doing French as is doing very well with that. She comes home and gives me & Mr B a French lesson! Oh-la-la!

TRINITY JEWELLERY - DESIGNS THAT STAND OUT
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
12-11-2004, 06:51 PM
Post: #5
Bloody English
Oh the jolly phonics - how much fun and laughter this brought to our house. What a simply splendid way to learn the complicated and complex English Language.

I am absolutely pants at any language and really sturggle to learn basic French, German, Spanish or Italian - I just don't get it at all - so am in no position to comment really.

But I wondered whether some languages were easier than others?? To me they are all of equal difficulty. You say that English is seen as one of the most difficult to learn - but is it more difficult than Chinese or Japanese or Maori for example. Voicey says that Maori only has 16 characters in its alphabet - now that is just a non starter for me - how can I disregard 10 letters???

I get so confused even thinking about another language. :confused: :confused:
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
13-11-2004, 04:42 AM
Post: #6
Bloody English
survivorfan Wrote:As in English language. How on earth do we manage to learn all its stupid variations?

I think the reason we really learn it is that we learn it first thru speaking, then later thru writing. Each of the "ou" sounds you mention are really their own distinct sounds based on where you put your tongue in your mouth when pronouncing them even though they are spelled the same way. Just say the words out loud and you should notice slight variations...usually characterized by whether the tongue is high, mid, or low in the mouth, used in the front or back of the mouth, spoken tense or lax, and whether the mouth is rounded or unrounded in shape when speaking it. I think it is mainly thru actually writing the words that it gets more confusing, with all our strange spellings for sounds.

Quote:But I wondered whether some languages were easier than others?? To me they are all of equal difficulty. You say that English is seen as one of the most difficult to learn - but is it more difficult than Chinese or Japanese or Maori for example. Voicey says that Maori only has 16 characters in its alphabet - now that is just a non starter for me - how can I disregard 10 letters???

I think it also depends on what language is your first language. If your first language is french, then it will probably be easier to pick up other romantic languages. If it is a tonal language, like Chinese, then it is easier to pick up other tonal languages. Although i don't think this is always the case.

This is a bit off topic, but I just read an interesting article on how those who speak a tonal language have better ability as musicians to recognize specific pitches, as tonal languages use pitch as a distinguishing factor in words.
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
13-11-2004, 08:34 AM
Post: #7
Bloody English
Islandman Wrote:Just say the words out loud and you should notice slight variations...

Being married to an American, I 'm aware that Americans are better at pronouncing the differences between similar sounding words than the British (well, English because that's who I'm used to hearing).

For instance, "if you're full, you fool, you'll fall" when spoken by many English people, the three words would sound indistinguishable, sort of "faw", but I think most Americans would prononce them differently. Also, the English often drop off the end sound of a word - where an American says caRRR, the English say CAA so that leads to a blurring of the word sound too.

What Are Your Views On Forum Moderation?[Image: hatter.jpg]
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
14-11-2004, 06:46 PM
Post: #8
Bloody English
I used to teach English in France to French kids - when asked for reasons why something was pronounced differently to the theory i had just explained, im afraid i ended up saying "Because it is ..." a lot, - it was really hard to come up with explanations!! Huh

"Wind" is a great one - try to explain why sometimes it is wind and other times wined Huh (then there's wined and wind too i suppose :glare: ) - have still yet to come up with an explanation (apart from context of course - but that doesn't actually help peeps learning the language!)

Ho hum :ninja: :wave:
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
14-11-2004, 06:58 PM
Post: #9
Bloody English
I hate teaching English spelling - it is so illogical

For example - you can make a case for pronouncing

GHOTI

as

FISH

(GH as in enouGH, O as in wOmen and TI as in naTIon)

I rest my caseSmile

What's so funny about peace, love and understanding?
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
14-11-2004, 07:46 PM
Post: #10
Bloody English
Rob Wrote:I hate teaching English spelling - it is so illogical

For example - you can make a case for pronouncing

GHOTI

as

FISH

(GH as in enouGH, O as in wOmen and TI as in naTIon)

I rest my caseSmile

lol...good thing you explained it in parentheses..cause i was gonna wonder how the heck you could get the sound "fish" from ghoti. lol. I think I'm gonna spell it that way from now on just because i can. lol.
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 


Possibly Related Threads...
Thread: Author Replies: Views: Last Post
  Bloody Sunday Inquiry has cost £400million Groucho 17 3,748 17-07-2006 11:17 AM
Last Post: Isis

Forum Jump:


User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)