Post Reply 
 
Thread Rating:
  • 0 Vote(s) - 0 Average
  • 1
  • 2
  • 3
  • 4
  • 5
Dyslexia
05-12-2004, 03:14 PM
Post: #1
Dyslexia

My warrior girl age 11 has Dyslexia..
Her reading and spelling ages are 13 and 11 respectively. Her ability to comprehend story language is age 8 so she reads facts well, but cannot read Harry Potter with ease
Her ability to express herself in written and spoken language is about age 7 and still primitive. As a result she is allowed for homework to use more direct lifts from internet and books for info and her interpretation is not deemed as important, though she gets leeway for how she expresses her opinions. She is just beginning to feel embarresed by her writing except for poetry where she often manages but thats abstract. In the meantime we have been given a list of computer games and other input to help bridge this divide. Copletley fascinating the brain and the development of different areas, and how individual we all are (this child loves opera) I am so glad society is more tolerent and allows more arenas for individual exppression than previously.
Listening to her expalin alterations (alliteration) and 'on a matter of pies' hade me wheezing trying to stifle a laugh
Quote this message in a reply
05-12-2004, 05:40 PM
Post: #2
Dyslexia
What i also meant to say this variance in development expalins why people with dyslexia and very mild aspergers and autism can have difficulty expalining themselves and understanding full the whole situation. There are alot of young men inprison with dyslexia and its not just about being able to read and write its also about comrehending and understanding consequences.
Quote this message in a reply
05-12-2004, 07:36 PM
Post: #3
Dyslexia
sheoque Wrote:In the meantime we have been given a list of computer games and other input to help bridge this divide.
My 17 year old daughter has recently been diagnosed as dyslexic, how she passed 10 'O' levels s a mystery, she is proving obstinate in regards to any sort of help,(she is 'in love' at the moment.:wink2: ), would these aids help her at all?

[INDENT]

[/INDENT]
Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
05-12-2004, 11:16 PM
Post: #4
Dyslexia
Depends on the type of Dyslexia and her overall IQ the higher the IQ the easier dyslexia is to manage and is tolerated.
My daughter still cannot seperate story from reality and that is linked to language as well as other factors.
For a high IQ dyslexic as far as I am aware you should keep re-inforcing the spelling rules, sort of boring repetitios stuff but does help.... and then when you leave education get a job where it doesn't matter. I know you get a waiver if you have ed psych statement to say you are dyslexic. Best bet is to see Uni or 6th form learning support co-ordinator for specific learning disabilities and they will advise. Let the school or college advise her don't tell her unless they ask you to...as she will resent it.

Dyslexia will not prevent anyone with the ability to get into university, but if they need the support and reject it that will affect opportunities. There is ayoung man at OXford who arrived age 16 ( after a fight for resources) with a scribe and a reader, very brilliant boy but he can not read or write.

The most important thing for anyone is to feel they are absolutely perfect as who they are dylexia and all! BTW txt langg is gt 4 ld (learnign disabled) and dyslexic people. NOte I never ever text NEVER can't be bothered
Quote this message in a reply
07-12-2004, 11:00 AM
Post: #5
Dyslexia
Sheoque - why are you shown as being a 'guest' ?

My sympathies for your children being diagnosed .... but im positive it wont hold them back in their latter years. Many many people i know have dyslexia, and they have gone on to have VERY successful careers.

I dont know this for sure, but if a dyslexic child has trouble reading the written word, cant they now get special glasses which make reading easier ?

I'm not perfect, but im so close it scares me
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
07-12-2004, 12:00 PM
Post: #6
Dyslexia
Bonsai Wrote:Sheoque - why are you shown as being a 'guest' ?

My sympathies for your children being diagnosed .... but im positive it wont hold them back in their latter years. Many many people i know have dyslexia, and they have gone on to have VERY successful careers.

Tom Cruise, Sir Jackie Stewart, Anthony Hopkins, Richard Branson, Robbie Williams, Kenny Logan, Winston Churchill and Sir Steve Redgrave to name a few.

TRINITY JEWELLERY - DESIGNS THAT STAND OUT
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
07-12-2004, 12:04 PM
Post: #7
Dyslexia
Bella Wrote:Tom Cruise, Sir Jackie Stewart, Anthony Hopkins, Richard Branson, Robbie Williams, Kenny Logan, Winston Churchill and Sir Steve Redgrave to name a few.

My point exactly :laugh:

I'm not perfect, but im so close it scares me
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
07-12-2004, 08:58 PM
Post: #8
Dyslexia
Bonsai Wrote:Sheoque - why are you shown as being a 'guest' ?
It's odd isn't it, and somewhat upsetting.
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
08-12-2004, 09:19 AM
Post: #9
Dyslexia
An existing member will appear as 'Guest' when their account is deleted.

On Sheoque's instructions, I deleted her account.
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
08-12-2004, 10:23 PM
Post: #10
Dyslexia
I think there are aspects to this you are unaware of Haydon -but there seems to be a problem with your PM receiving?

Would it be better posting it here?
Visit this user's website Find all posts by this user
Quote this message in a reply
Post Reply 


Forum Jump:


User(s) browsing this thread: 1 Guest(s)