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Fallujah firebombs.
04-12-2004, 11:17 PM
Post: #1
Fallujah firebombs.

AMY GOODMAN: As we turn finally to Baghdad, to the independent reporter Dahr Jamail whose latest piece says the U.S. military has used poison gas and other non-conventional weapons against the civilians of Fallujah. Welcome to Democracy Now!
DAHR JAMAIL: Thanks very much for having me again, Amy.

AMY GOODMAN: Can you talk about exactly what is your understanding of what is used and who were the victims?

DAHR JAMAIL: I have interviewed many refugees over the last week coming out of Fallujah at different times from different locations within the city. The consistent stories that I have been getting have been refugees describing phosphorous weapons, horribly burned bodies, fires that burn on people when they touch these weapons, and they are unable to extinguish the fires even after dumping large amounts of water on the people. Many people are reporting cluster bombs, as well. And these are coming from the camps that I have been to, different people who have emerged from Fallujah anywhere from one week ago up to on through up toward near the very beginning of the siege.

AMY GOODMAN: Can you talk about further knowledge of phosphorus weapons?

DAHR JAMAIL: Well, it's, weapon very similar to napalm, essentially a flammable weapon mixed with jet fuel where it dropped in a bomb, at least refugees I interviewed about this said it was a bomb that exploded and covered huge areas with fire. And then anyone that, of course, was hit with it was burned usually beyond recognition and then the fires continued to burn on the ground and if anyone went up and had any contact with the material, then they would catch on fire and people were unable to put them out.

AMY GOODMAN: Dahr Jamail speaking to us from Baghdad. And the places you are going to interview the victims?

DAHR JAMAIL: There are several refugee camps now, all around central Iraq, as well as many in Baghdad. One was conducted in a refugee camp at Baghdad University near a small mosque there. This camp, in fact, I was there just the other day, in the afternoon and one of the sheiks in the refugee camp said that day at noon, U.S. military had shown up with Iraqi National Guard, went through their camp looking for wounded fighters in order to detain them. Of course there were none there and he complained that all of the women and all of the children were terrorized, why are the Americans doing this? First they completely destroy our city, now when we are refugees; they terrorize us in the camps. Why are they doing this to us?


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05-12-2004, 02:36 PM
Post: #2
Fallujah firebombs.
Could you add a question or observation to this in your own words Secrets?

At the moment it's just a quote copied and pasted from the net, so I'm not sure what it is that you want people to say.
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05-12-2004, 02:58 PM
Post: #3
Fallujah firebombs.
If this is indeed true then it is so horrendous I feel sick.. I feel so appallingly ashamed of our goverment and powerless to do anything other than write...again.
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05-12-2004, 03:27 PM
Post: #4
Fallujah firebombs.
There is no mention of this on the BBC news website. I would have thought the BBC would feature this story as it's so contraversial , I wonder why they haven't.

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05-12-2004, 05:38 PM
Post: #5
Fallujah firebombs.
BBC acts with the goverment approval llok what happened last time......
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05-12-2004, 06:24 PM
Post: #6
Fallujah firebombs.
I would have thought then that this would have been headline news on at least one of the tabloids..........that's what happened last time.

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05-12-2004, 06:48 PM
Post: #7
Fallujah firebombs.
Nox Wrote:Could you add a question or observation to this in your own words Secrets?

At the moment it's just a quote copied and pasted from the net, so I'm not sure what it is that you want people to say.

Sorry Nox, i really wanted to see if anyone replied to what is a 'serious' topic.
I did this on another board and we had quite a debate about it.
There, as far as we could find, are several articles on it online, but no 'proof.
The most disturbing thing we found was that the US admits using it in Iraq.
That some 40,000 civilians remain through one reason or another trapped in Falujah is a fact, and whatever means of attack is used they almost certainly suffer from it.

[Image: incendiary.gif]
The Pentagon said it had not tried to deceive. It drew a distinction between traditional napalm, first invented in 1942, and the weapons dropped in Iraq, which it calls Mark 77 firebombs. They weigh 510lbs, and consist of 44lbs of polystyrene-like gel and 63 gallons of jet fuel.

Officials said that if journalists had asked about the firebombs their use would have been confirmed.
A spokesman admitted they were "remarkably similar" to napalm but said they caused less environmental damage.

The Independent on Sunday quoted an American commander, Colonel James Alles of Marine Air Group 11, admitting the use of napalm in Iraq.

He said: "We napalmed both those [bridge] approaches. Unfortunately there were people there ... you could see them in the [cockpit] video. They were Iraqi soldiers. It's no great way to die. The generals love napalm. It has a big psychological effect."

The Pentagon has denied using napalm, but there is evidence from several pilots and commanders that the weapons was deployed in the advance on Baghdad, dropped near bridges over the Saddam Canal and the Tigris river, south of Baghdad.

An Australian newspaper reported a suspected napalm attack in the south of Iraq, and quoted a marine sergeant as saying: "I pity anyone who is in there. We told them to surrender."

Pentagon officials have tried to avoid describing the bombs used in Iraq as napalm. They claim the technology has been refined to cause less environmental damage.
The United States admitted dropping the internationally-banned incendiary weapon of napalm on Iraq, despite earlier denials by the Pentagon that the "horrible" weapon had not been used in the three-week invasion.

An upgraded type of the weapon, a terrifying mixture of jet fuel and polystyrene that sticks to skin as it burns, was used in March and April 2003, when dozens of napalm bombs were dropped near bridges over the Saddam Canal and the Tigris river, south of Baghdad, the Independent reported Sunday, August 10.

"We napalmed both those [bridge] approaches," the paper quoted Colonel James Alles, commander of Marine Air Group 11, as saying.

"Unfortunately there were people there ... you could see them in the [cockpit] video. They were Iraqi soldiers. It's no great way to die," said Alles.

On March 22 a correspondent for Sydney Morning Herald, traveling with U.S. marines reported that [b]napalm was used in an attack on Iraqi troops at Safwan Hill, near the Kuwait border.

His account was based on statements by two U.S. marines officers on the ground.


"Safwan Hill went up in a huge fireball and the observation post was obliterated. I pity anyone who is in there," a Marine sergeant said.
...
Marine Corps Maj-Gen Jim Amos confirmed to the paper that napalm was used on several occasions in the invasion.

A 1980 U.N. convention banned the use against civilian targets of napalm. The U.S., which did not sign the treaty, is one of the few countries that makes use of the weapon, as it was employed notoriously against both civilian and military targets in the Vietnam war, according to the Independent.
...
The Pentagon said it had not tried to deceive. It drew a distinction between traditional napalm, first invented in 1942, and the weapons dropped in Iraq, which it calls Mark 77 firebombs. They weigh 510lbs, and consist of 44lbs of polystyrene-like gel and 63 gallons of jet fuel.

John Pike, director of the military studies group GlobalSecurity.Org, said: "You can call it something other than napalm but it is still napalm. It has been reformulated in the sense that they now use a different petroleum distillate, but that is it. The U.S. is the only country that has used napalm for a long time. I am not aware of any other country that uses it."[/b]

Since the beginning of the US-attac on Fallujah the city is almost completely closed; which means that men between 15 and 55 are not allowed to leave the city. Helicopters and Snipers shoot on those who try to flee.
US-army Sources say about 1200 "insurgents" have been killed; the number of dead civilians is not reported - and, probably: not counted. At the moment there are still about 50.000 to 100.000 people in the city.




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05-12-2004, 07:59 PM
Post: #8
Fallujah firebombs.
The bbc are the goverments puppets, tony blair is the americans puppet and iraq is blairs and the americans puppet,
To many puppets for me
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06-12-2004, 01:17 PM
Post: #9
Fallujah firebombs.
I hadn't previously heard of the US using napalm in Iraq. I'm surprised the US would use it when there's a UN convention banning the stuff.

As for the civilians in Fallujah, well it must've been absolutely horrendous for them. The lucky ones are those that escaped to the refugee camps before the assault started, and even those lucky ones will have had their livelihoods destroyed. As for those that stayed in Fallujah, they'd need to be pretty lucky to have survived. Regardless of whether napalm was used or not, there's been so much bombing and shooting in the city the odds for any civilians cannot have been good.

Despite all that, I think the US was right to attack Fallujah. It was acting as a base for the anti-American insurgents who have been killing hundreds of Iraqis by bombings and shootings. There's no way the US or the Iraqi government could have continued to ignore that forever. Since there didn't seem to be any peaceful way of evicting the insurgents from Fallujah an assault was the only option IMO.

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06-12-2004, 05:55 PM
Post: #10
Fallujah firebombs.
mikado Wrote:As for the civilians in Fallujah, well it must've been absolutely horrendous for them. The lucky ones are those that escaped to the refugee camps before the assault started, and even those lucky ones will have had their livelihoods destroyed.

Fallujah refugees in desperate need of aid: UN

More than 200,000 people who fled Fallujah ahead of the US offensive have yet to return and many are in desperate need of aid, with temperatures in Iraq heading towards freezing, a new UN emergency report says.

Figures compiled by the International Organisation for Migration show that 210,600 people, or more than 35,000 families, have taken refuge in towns and villages around Fallujah.

Nearly all those people remain outside the city, where the population was estimated at 250,000-300,000 before the attack.

US forces are maintaining a cordon around Fallujah as sporadic fighting continues.

Troops are preventing refugees from returning, saying they want to stagger the return so that basic facilities can be restored before people go home.

Most areas of the city remain without power, water, sewage and other basic services.

It is expected to take much longer than previously thought to start reconstruction as hundreds of buildings are completely destroyed.

"The return to Fallujah may take a matter of months rather than days, as was previously suggested by multi-national forces," the document said.

The report, entitled Emergency Working Group - Fallujah Crisis, has been compiled by various aid agencies.

It says access to the camps for internally-displaced people is sporadic due to insecurity and military operations.

"Some sites have received assistance, whereas others... are reportedly difficult to access even by the Iraqi Health Ministry," it said.

It describes shortages of fresh food and cooking oil, and says there is serious concern about the cold.

Since October, when families first began fleeing Fallujah, temperatures in central Iraq have fallen from around 30 degrees Celsius to 2 degrees Celsius and sometimes colder overnight.

Many families fled with the clothes they were wearing and a few personal items, unprepared for the change in weather.

"The temperature has dropped, underscoring an urgent need for winterisation items and appropriate shelter," the report said.

The only aid agency that has managed to get into Fallujah to help the people who remained during the furious two-week offensive is the Iraqi Red Crescent Society.

It arrived with three truck loads of food and medical supplies, eight ambulances and several doctors, about 10 days ago and is working from offices in the city centre.

The US military is also attempting to provide assistance.

At one aid distribution point it recently delivered a supply of American snack food, including frosted flakes, granola bars and bagel chips to needy families, many of whom were left confused by the foreign food and frustrated.

The offensive on Fallujah was designed to rid the city of insurgents holed up there for months and put Iraqi security services back in charge in time for elections due on January 30.

- Reuters

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