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Migraines
09-10-2006, 09:56 AM
Post: #1
Migraines

Does anyone else suffer with these ?

I am a recent sufferer and i started to get them about 3 years ago. I only have about one a year, but will the amount increase as i get older ?

I had one last night. It started at 4pm with a general headache - which wouldnt go. Then i started getting shooting pains at the back of my left eye (which then wouldn't stop leaking with water) and i became light sensitive.

I must of popped about 10 extra strength paracetamol in the space of 4hrs !! I was desperate for it to go as i couldnt even move my head and it felt as though an axe was sticking in it (not that i have experienced that often !!).

I managed to get to bed, but then i got all upset and thought i had a brain tumour Huh

This morning the headache has gone, but im left feeling a little weak.

So - does anyone else suffer, and are there certain things i could do to make myself feel better ?

I'm not perfect, but im so close it scares me
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09-10-2006, 10:07 AM
Post: #2
Migraines
I got terribly bad ones at secondary school - I would lose vision in one eye and distorted vision in the other and intense pain round my skull - but all they did in those days (the seventies) was send me home from school with a couple of anadin and was told to lie in a dark room until they went.

I got glasses some time later and they seemed to dissipate. Maybe you could get your eyes tested, as eyestrain might be a factor?

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09-10-2006, 10:09 AM
Post: #3
Migraines
I get extremely bad headaches some times but not really migraines. My brother used to when we were little though, he'd lay in bed crying and mum used to try every type of migraine medication she could... I think migraleave (sp?) helped a bit, and obviously staying in bed in a darkened room (but I guess you know that) aside from that I don't really know what else you can do except wait it out.

Hope you recover fully soon!
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09-10-2006, 11:43 AM
Post: #4
Migraines
Bons, ask your GP for a food allergy test. A friend of mine suffered terribly with migraines a few years ago, she was sent to a migraine referral unit at the London. They did a bunch of tests on her and found that her migraines were triggered by chocolate, caffeine and cheese.

Since then she's cut them out of her diet and only gets minor ones now and then in times of stress.

She's right moody cow though :bag:


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09-10-2006, 11:55 AM
Post: #5
Migraines
Bons I average around two to three migraines a month. They are quite debilitating and I do find I have to shift my life around for them. The pain is like someone stabbing you in the eye and then pushing the knife through the head and down the back of it until it reaches the neck. It's awful. I really sympathise with you. I also get light and sound sensitive and I do have an aura with mine. As Floop says, try getting your doctor to send you to a migraine specialist (mine has yet to do that!). Different foods can set them off.

The best you can do is lie in a dark room, still with a wet cloth over your face and take the strongest painkillers you can find. Unfortunately I can't take painkillers at all as they do weird stuff to me, so I just have to suffer them out. There are medications you can take that can prevent them. So give them a try. (I can't take any of those either)

Good news is though that migraines do tend to cease after the age of forty or so, so I am looking forward to next year!:w00t:

"You cannot teach people anything. You can only help them discover it within themselves."
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09-10-2006, 12:21 PM
Post: #6
Migraines
Thanks for all your replies. I think i know what my trigger is though .... my period.

Like i said, i have only had them a few times, but im positive its always been on the first day of my period. It was yesterday.

I always get a mild headache for the first day of my period (Im on the pill) but just once a year I get a migraine.

I'm not perfect, but im so close it scares me
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09-10-2006, 06:05 PM
Post: #7
Migraines
I do feel for you Bonsai. Mirgaines are awful.

My last one lasted four days and was very painful.

Not sure I beleive the "none after 40" theory though, as I'm 43 and they have become more intense over the last two or three years! I never suffered from them at all until after my son was born.

My son has suffered since he was three. His trigger is tiredness.

My triggers are tiredness and the start of my period (sometimes but not always).
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09-10-2006, 06:32 PM
Post: #8
Migraines
I agree with Dol - I used to have occasional attacks from mid-teens to twenties, but from mid-thirties through to my forties, they increased both in intensity and frequency. Auras, vomiting and pain like a vice round my head and int the back of my neck. The ones that last for days are the most utter hell, and I wouldn't travel anywhere without a stack of painkillers.

My local GP even had me listed as OK for pethidine as that was the only thing that would give relief (the emergency doctors thought I was putting it on for the drugs)

My triggers were adrenaline related - the weekend migraine, and bright/flickering lights.

The good news is, since my hysterectomy, I haven't had one and rarely get a headache. Bit of a drastic recourse though :surrender:

However, the new treatments are better than ever - I eventually got one called Naramig which usually minimised it quite well - it really is worth talking to your doctor, Bons.

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09-10-2006, 06:59 PM
Post: #9
Migraines
My eldest gets them quite badly and, as floops said, can be triggered/worsened by food, particularly cheese. Tiredness is also a major contributor. We find he often has them on a Monday and we think this is partly because of tiredness from playing rugby on the Sunday.

We find that if he catches the headache in time and drinks loads of water and takes a painkiller, it doesn't turn into a migraine. However, if it does, he spends 10 minutes with his head down the loo and puts himself to bed. Bless him, I feel so sorry for him and he's had them since he was about 5 years old. My mum and elder brother used to suffer badly, so I guess it's hereditary. He's had loads of tests and doctors say he should grow out of it.

I tend to get a headache most days, but a couple of Nurofen usually sorts it out. I used to get stress related cluster headaches, which could last up to a week.
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09-10-2006, 08:24 PM
Post: #10
Migraines
Long time sufferer here. Definitely seems "hormone" related in some cases. Mine started at puberty, got worse during my first pregnancy and then I had about 6 years with only 3 or 4 bad ones until my second pregnancy and they returned on a regular basis.

Triggers were a drop in sugar levels (brought on by lack of food, so dieting would always trigger it off) cheese, coffee, emotional times, excessive heat and tiredness.

Mine were "classic migraines" that started with visual disturbances, only seeing half of everything, then fuzzy blurred vision, numbness, tingling, slurred speech and then the relentless headache building up til it was unbearable and culminating in vomiting. Usually felt better after that and the headache subsided.

In the last 3 or 4 years they have become a lot less frequent, maybe one or two in a six months period and I only get the visual disturbances, not the pounding headache.

At the first signs I take soluable Aspirin and eat something sweet, even sugar if that's all there is. Despite doctors always advising you to lie down I've found it's best to stay upright and walk about if you can, or at least stay propped up on pillows. I think lying down makes the blood rush to your head quicker and aggravates it. Staying upright seems to prevent this.

I wondered why if I got one when I was out and had to get myself home it was never as bad as if I was at home and would lie down straight away. I figured that this might be the reason but I've no medical evidence to prove or disprove my theory.

I feel for everyone who suffers - I know they can severely interfere with normal life.
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