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Reading in Schools
01-12-2005, 07:09 PM
Post: #1
Reading in Schools

I'm so angry that after years and years of me saying that children are not taught to read the way we were, and that the "look and say" method that they tried when mine were little and whatever method they used when my grandson went to school, just wasn't as effective as the old method, they are now going back to the old method of helping children build the words up by the sound of the letters.

I used to get so frustrated when hearing my grandson read and when he was stuck on a word I tried to get him to do the sounds of the letters and he didn't have a clue.

If we, as parents and grandparents could see so long ago that it wasn't working, why has it taken "them" all this time to figure it out.

It's too late to do my children or my grandson any good all of whom had/have reading difficulties. :ranting:
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01-12-2005, 07:54 PM
Post: #2
Reading in Schools
I have had numerous conversations about this with other parents and lately grandparents. Sometimes the old ways are the best ways and sadly childrens reading has fallen by the wayside because of those in charge of education insisting they know best.

When trying to help my grandchildren with their education I am always being told "no Nan they don't teach us like that now". Maybe in the light of this they will look at the whole system of teaching.

I don't understand why they force very young children to do joined up writing (probably there is a fancy name for that but that is what we used to call it).

I think it confuses children that are learning to read as the words look nothing like they are being taught to write. We had to master the forming of the letters in primary school and then went on to joined up writing in junior school.
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01-12-2005, 09:40 PM
Post: #3
Reading in Schools
I wholeheartdley agree ladies.

My oldest learned to read with the breakdown method, the youngest one tells me I just have to tell him the word! I say '****** off you work it out for yourself' or words to that effect anyway.:ninja:

edit to say: I am sure we could say b.ugger before
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01-12-2005, 10:50 PM
Post: #4
Reading in Schools
You see, this is where Scottish & English education are different because at my daughter's school they are taught the sounds of the letters. I agree that this is the best way. The English language is supposed to be one of the hardest to learn as a foreign language and if kids who speak the language can't get it right, imagine what it must be like for those trying to learn it.

TRINITY JEWELLERY - DESIGNS THAT STAND OUT
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01-12-2005, 11:39 PM
Post: #5
Reading in Schools
Bella, my kids get taught the phonics way as well.
They use a character called inky mouse, and have actions to go with the sounds of the letters, then in time they lose the actions and just remember the letters.
then they get to the stage of what they call blending the sounds together to make the words.
This system has worked so well for my boys, even though there are words that don't sound like they should, but they learn those words as "tricky words".

I just think the government want to be seen to be doing something with education, without putting any cash into it. Pretty much like anything else in this society, if it's cheap and makes the government look good, then they will do it.

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02-12-2005, 06:01 PM
Post: #6
Reading in Schools
Still on the subject of education gone mad I want to know why they insist on teaching a child (my grandson) German (or French he could have done) when he is struggling to learn his own language!

I think I made this point before but I'm going to say it again anyway. Fine, introduce another language if a child is reaching the required standard in English but when they are at the lower end of the scale, surely it would be better to concentrate on English only. At this rate he will leave school hardly able to read or write English but able to count to 10 in German :ranting:
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02-12-2005, 06:29 PM
Post: #7
Reading in Schools
I am amazed that anyone can remember how they learned how to read - really I am. I am not even sure that the way my youngest is taught is not the way I was taught??

I was discussing language with my boss's wife today, they have a Polish nanny, who's English is marvellous. My boss's wife is big into sign language and the polish nanny is being taught sign language [she has asked to learn it btw] and IMO it is a universal language - I think when I get a spare moment I would quite like to learn it as well.

I always cook with wine, and sometimes I actually put it in the food.
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04-12-2005, 01:22 AM
Post: #8
Reading in Schools
I think I learned how to read with something called Look, Say, Cover, Write, Check But I have always been a good reader so it just comes natural to me.
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04-12-2005, 05:26 PM
Post: #9
Reading in Schools
Flip Wrote:I am amazed that anyone can remember how they learned how to read - really I am. I am not even sure that the way my youngest is taught is not the way I was taught??

I was discussing language with my boss's wife today, they have a Polish nanny, who's English is marvellous. My boss's wife is big into sign language and the polish nanny is being taught sign language [she has asked to learn it btw] and IMO it is a universal language - I think when I get a spare moment I would quite like to learn it as well.

Is someone in the family deaf then Flip? I worked with a deaf girl when I lived in London. We were in a big typing pool and she was very isolated so I learned signing - taught myself from a book from the RNID. We used to chat across the office Smile
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04-12-2005, 06:43 PM
Post: #10
Reading in Schools
[QUOTE=Critique

I used to get so frustrated when hearing my grandson read and when he was stuck on a word I tried to get him to do the sounds of the letters and he didn't have a clue.

[/quote]


it's funny you should say that as my 7 year old son has reading difficulties, and at the last parent day his teacher told me to sound the words to help him, he 's very good at it and it does help him, it's a shame your Grandson has'nt been taught to do that, maybe some schools just teach differently.

How much easier it is to be critical than to be correct.
Benjamin Disraeli


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