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The expression 'y'all'
05-12-2006, 10:18 AM
Post: #1
The expression 'y'all'

Mrs Sf's Texan relatives say y'all, so does MSG - I always thought it was a down-south expression originating in the US but surprisingly it's a down-south expression originating in the south of England which emigrated with the Mayflower, eventually to be lost here but still going strong over there. Just thought I'd share that.

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05-12-2006, 10:24 AM
Post: #2
The expression 'y'all'
survivorfan Wrote:Mrs Sf's Texan relatives say y'all, so does MSG - I always thought it was a down-south expression originating in the US but surprisingly it's a down-south expression originating in the south of England which emigrated with the Mayflower, eventually to be lost here but still going strong over there. Just thought I'd share that.

We say ya'll in our house due to Mr tiggs being from the South and myself having lived there for quite a few years and of course, Alyssa, having being born and living there for some of her childhood.

I found it interesting to see on the news the other night, that the pilgrims didn't actually arrive from Plymouth, they now have archeological evidence that the first pilgrims sailed from London. They also said that the American dialect comes from the London accent. I can't see that myself, as it seems to have more of an Irish twang to me.

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05-12-2006, 10:28 AM
Post: #3
The expression 'y'all'
I find that interesting sf!! I'd already found that a lot of our Southern words are not so unique after all, as they originate from the 'Scots-Irish' that are responsible for the settling of the Southern states. I've posted a 'Southern Slang/Word' site before and someone and I noticed that there were more similars than dissimilars!! Ex-Mr. Ms has cousins in Wisconsin...waaaaaay up North US, and they are constantly picking apart our speech when visiting and it always gets me thinking about how much 700 miles can affect language! I have found it very easy to pick up on you all's speech/slang/word usuage though. Of course I read a whole lot and I do bother to ask when I don't know what something means!:nerd: Y'all have a good day now, y'hear!:applause:

I guess I'm Cornish...:unsure:
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05-12-2006, 01:41 PM
Post: #4
The expression 'y'all'
LONG POST WARNING

There's a very good book by Bill Bryson (does he actually sell in the US?) - Made In America which goes into the development of American English. Here's an extract:

"... what is certain is that Britons and Americans (at the time of the Revolution) sounded quite different from Britons and Americans of today, and in a multitude of ways. Both would have dropped the w sound in backward, Edward and somewhat, but preserved it in sword. THey would not have pronounced the c in verdict or predict or the l in vault, fault and soldier. Words like author and anthem would have been pronounced with a hard t as in orator, or even a d - fathoms for instance was sometimes spelt 'fadams'. Banquet would have been pronounced 'banket'. Balcony rhymed with baloney. Barrage was pronounced 'bair-idge' and remained so pronounced up to the time of WW1. Words that we now pronounce with an interior -ew sound frequently lacked it then, so that mute and volume would have been 'moot' and 'voloom'. Vowel sounds in general were much less settled and specific, combinations that are now enunciated were then glossed over, so that many speakers said 'partickly' for particularly, 'actilly' for actually, 'poplar' for popular, and so on.
18th century users had a greater choice of contractions than now: as well as can't, don't, isn't and so on, there was han't or hain't for 'have not' and an't for 'are not' and 'am not'. An't, first recorded in 1723 in print in America though probably older, evolved in two directions. Rhymed with 'taunt' it took on the spelling aren't, rhymed with 'taint' it took on the spelling ain't. Critics gradually developed a distaste for ain't and by the 19c it was widely if unreasonably condemned as vulgar.
In contemporary writing we find 'git' for get, 'libity' for liberty, 'patchis' for purchase, 'ort' for ought, 'weamin' for women, 'nater' for nature, 'keer' for care, 'jest' for just, 'ole' for old, 'darter' or 'dafter' for daughter. 'Chaw' for chew, 'varmint' for vermin, 'stomp' for stamp, 'heist' for hoist, 'hoss' for horse , and 'tetchy' for touchy were commonly if not invariably heard among educated speakers on both sides of the Atlantic. All of this suggests that if we wished to find a modern-day model for British and American speech of the late 18c we could probably do no better than Yosemite Sam.
Today it remains a commonplace in England that American English is a corrupted form of British speech, that the inhabitants of the New World display a kind of helpless, chronic, 'want of refinement' every time they open their mouths and attempt to make sounds. In fact, in several significant ways it is British speech that has become corrupted - or to put it in less reactionary terms, has quietly evolved. The tendency to pronounce fertile, mobile and other such words as if spelled 'fertle' and 'moble', to give a u sound to hover, grovel and Coventry all reflect British speech patterns up to the end of the 18c. Even the feature that Americans most closely associate with modern British speech, the practice of saying 'bahth', 'cahn't' and 'banahna' for bath, can't and banana seems to have been unknown among British speakers at the time of the American Revolution. Pronunciation guides as late as 1809 give no hint of such a pronunciation in British speech, although there is some evidence to suggest that it was used by London Cockneys (which would make it one of the few instances in modern linguistics in which a manner of utterance travelled upward from the lower classes.) Not only did British and American speakers of the day say bath and path with a flat a, but even words like jaunt, hardly, palm and father. Two incidental relics of this old pattern of pronunciation are the general American pronunciation of aunt (ie 'ant') and sassy, which is how people once said saucy."

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05-12-2006, 02:00 PM
Post: #5
The expression 'y'all'
Bill Bryson is in my library and I've read "Notes from a Small Island" (??) And they had a documentary on the Mayflower on for Thanksgiving and they said the same thing tigger...that the original voyage left from London, b/c that's where the benefactors came from and where they got the 2 ships, the Mayflower and the Godspeed. The Godspeed didn't make it very far till it had to return and the Mayflower ended up going on.

Back to the language thing though, they say a lot of 'Southern Speak' is a 'Scots-Irish' blend of language, b/c of the people who settled the South. In N. MS I sound different to the locals b/c I have the Coastal/Louisiana dialect. I don't know if anybody knows who Lorretta Lynn the country singer is, but I tell msboy#2 he's kin to her b/c he sounds like he was plucked from her yard...he actually sounds like his paternal realatives and I have people comment on how I sound vs. how the boys talk. And I notice it when I'm talking to the Daphster or other peeps from the 'real' South!!

I guess I'm Cornish...:unsure:
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05-12-2006, 05:37 PM
Post: #6
The expression 'y'all'
In Scotland we just say "youse"!

My mother in law is a huge fan of Bill Bryson and has been known to laugh out loud at his books.

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06-12-2006, 02:01 PM
Post: #7
The expression 'y'all'
I use y'all alot more than I thought I did...must be a south thing then...Huh

Anyone else say Chuggy Back instead of piggy back?

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06-12-2006, 02:04 PM
Post: #8
The expression 'y'all'
Coastie Wrote:I use y'all alot more than I thought I did...must be a south thing then...Huh

Anyone else say Chuggy Back instead of piggy back?

When we were kids we called a piggy back a "kilicode" - don't know if this is the right spelling or where it originates from though!:blink:

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06-12-2006, 06:57 PM
Post: #9
The expression 'y'all'
Bella Wrote:When we were kids we called a piggy back a "kilicode" - don't know if this is the right spelling or where it originates from though!:blink:
A few friends of mine from Paisley call it that too, Bella. What's wrong with you all!? It's clearly a "carry-code"!

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06-12-2006, 07:13 PM
Post: #10
The expression 'y'all'
Chuggy back...and when you are short on syllables a simple 'Giza Chug' will do! :thumbsup:

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