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and here comes Alberto...
12-06-2006, 02:40 AM
Post: #1
and here comes Alberto...

going with my theme of who got the blame for Katrina and the list of storms for 2006, we have our first contestant, Alberto.

I guess I'm Cornish...:unsure:
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12-06-2006, 09:54 PM
Post: #2
and here comes Alberto...
:cry: ...OH NO!...not hurricane season again! :rain: :cold: :shock: :excl:

...i'm still exhausted from the last one...and i'm living about 3000 miles away!

:sun: w o o d s t o c k:beer:
"I'm not a bird, I'm a festival!" :bored:
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13-06-2006, 08:59 AM
Post: #3
and here comes Alberto...
How do they pick names for Hurricanes?
Like..is there a Q or something?
Do you send your name in and wait to hear back from a special committee if your name has been chosen? Or is it waaaaaaaaaay more scientific than that!
:-O
(Not that i want to be the name of a hurricane associated with death and destruction or anything........ I'm just curious.)

'Come away, oh human child, to the waters and the wild.With a fairy hand in hand...for the world is more full of weeping than you will understand.........'
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16-06-2006, 04:52 AM
Post: #4
and here comes Alberto...
Hurricane Names
To better track hurricanes, weather officials decided to name them. The names are chosen by the World Meteorological Organization. According to the National Oceanic & Atmospheric Administration (NOAA):

"For several hundred years, hurricanes in the West Indies were often named after the particular saint’s day on which the hurricane occurred. For example, 'Hurricane San Felipe' struck Puerto Rico on September 13, 1876. Another storm struck Puerto Rico on the same day in 1928, and this storm was named 'Hurricane San Felipe the Second.'"

Until World War II, hurricanes were given only masculine names. In the early 1950s, weather services began naming storms alphabetically and with only feminine names. By the late 1970s, this practice was replaced with alternating masculine and feminine names. The first hurricane of the season is given a name starting with the letter A, the second with the letter B and so on. According to NOAA, "the name lists... have an international flavor because hurricanes affect other nations and are tracked by the public and weather services of many countries."

Hurricanes in the Pacific Ocean are assigned a different set of names than Atlantic storms. For example, the first hurricane of the 2001 hurricane season was a Pacific Ocean storm near Acapulco, Mexico, named Adolf. The first Atlantic storm of the 2001 season would be named Allison. A list of names through 2006 is available from the National Hurricane Center.

According to the NOAA:

"Whenever a hurricane has had a major impact, any country affected by the storm can request that the name of the hurricane be “retired” by agreement of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO). Retiring a name actually means that it cannot be reused for at least 10 years, to facilitate historic references, legal actions, insurance claim activities, etc. and avoid public confusion with another storm of the same name."

For a list of hurricane names that have been retired, check out this site.


Hope this helps Aon...I'll get the site and the retired names in next post...

I guess I'm Cornish...:unsure:
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16-06-2006, 05:13 AM
Post: #5
and here comes Alberto...
Subject: B3) What names have been retired in the Atlantic and East Pacific basin?

Kindly provided by Gary Padgett, Jack Beven, and James Lewis Free.

In the Atlantic basin, tropical cyclone names are "retired" (that is, not to be used again for a new storm) if it is deemed to be quite noteworthy because of the damage and/or deaths it caused. This is to prevent confusion with a historically well-known cyclone with a current one in the Atlantic basin. The following list gives the names that have been retired and the year of the storm in question.
Retired hurricane names
Atlantic Audrey 1957, Agnes 1972, Anita 1977, Allen 1980, Alicia 1983, Andrew 1992, Allison 2001
Betsy 1965, Beulah 1967, Bob 1991
Connie 1955 ,Carla 1961, Cleo 1964, Carol 1965, Camille 1969, Celia 1970, Carmen 1974, Cesar 1996, Charley 2004
Diane 1955, Donna 1960, Dora 1964, David 1979, Diana 1990
Edna 1968, Eloise 1975, Elena 1985
Flora 1963, Fifi 1974, Frederic 1979, Fran 1996, Floyd 1999, Fabian 2003, Frances 2004
Gracie 1959, Gloria 1985, Gilbert 1988, Georges 1998
Hazel 1954, Hattie 1961, Hilda 1964, Hugo 1989,Hortense 1996
Ione 1955, Inez 1966, Iris 2001, Isidore 2002, Isabel 2003, Ivan 2004
Janet 1955, Joan 1988, Juan 2003, Jeanne 2004
Klaus 1990, Keith 2000
Luis 1995, Lenny 1999, Lili 2002
Marilyn 1995, Mitch 1998, Michelle 2001
Opal 1995
Roxanne 1995
Name retired because of previous storm with the same name.

Although rarer, some East Pacific names have been retired from the list. The climatology of this basin has most hurricanes moving away from the shore, so chances are rare that these storms would adversely affect people necessitating the name be retired.

Retired hurricane names
East Pacific Adolph 2001
Kenna 2002
Israel 2001
Name retired because of political considerations

Last updated August 13, 2004


Subject: B7) How can I nominate a new name for the list?

Contributed by Frank Lepore (NHC)

Since 1978, the United Nations' World Meteorological Organization, a group representing some 120 different countries, has used pre-determined lists of names for tropical storms for each ocean basin of the world. The Atlantic basin, which falls under Regional Association IV, has a six year supply of names with 21 names for each year. Why 21 names? Well, the letters Q, U, X, Y and Z are not used because names beginning with those letters are in short supply (you would need at least 3 male and 3 female names for each letter, plus a back-up supply for those retired). Think about it; how many men and women do you know whose names begin with these letters?

When a damage or casualty producing storm like Mitch, Hugo or Andrew strikes, the country most affected by the storm may recommend to the WMO Regional Association that the name be "retired." Retiring a name is an act of respect for its victims, and reduces confusion in the insurance, legal or scientific literature. A retired name is replaced with a like-gender name beginning with the same letter. For example, Honduras recommended (1998) the name Mitch be retired and proposed the replacement name, Matthew, for consideration (and vote) by the 25-member countries of RA-IV. Fifty names have been retired since 1972 in the Atlantic basin .

The names used on the list must meet some fundamental criteria. They should be short, and readily understood when broadcast. Further the names must be culturally sensitive and not convey some unintended and potentially inflammatory meaning. The potential for misunderstanding increases when you figure that in the Atlantic basin there are twenty-four countries, reflecting an international mix of English, Spanish and French cultures.

Typically, over the historical record, about one storm each year causes so much death and destruction that its name is considered for retirement. This means that in a "normal" year, the odds are about 1 in 8 of requiring a replacement name, given that over the last 57 years (of reliable record) we've averaged slightly over 8 tropical storms and hurricanes per season (actually 8.6). So, it's more likely that letters/ names toward the front of the alphabet (letters A through H) might be retired.

The Director of the National Hurricane Center has a rather large file folder of nominated names that have already been submitted. The next time the need arises and it's a storm affecting mainly the United States, our Director will be casting about for a replacement tropical cyclone name. He will take out THE file to make a selection. But as we say, it's pure chance from there.

Subject: B6) What happens if they run out of names on the list?

Contributed by Neal Dorst

In the Atlantic and East Pacific, if they have run through the list they then used the Greek alphabet : Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta,... etc. . So if they ever have a Hurricane Omega you know it's been a busy year. At the present time there is no provision for retiring any of the Greek alphabet names, should one be so terrible as to be excluded. Fortunately, Tropical Storms Alpha and Beta in 2005 have been the only use of this option.

In the Central and West Pacific they have a perpetual lists of names, so when one list is through they simply start on the next.

Last Updated Oct. 26, 2005

Atlantic Names
2006
Alberto
Barry
Chantal
Dean
Erin
Felix
Gabrielle
Humberto
Ingrid
Jerry
Karen
Lorenzo
Melissa
Noel
Olga
Pablo
Rebekah
Sebastien
Tanya
Van
Wendy
2007
Andrea
Beryl
Chris
Debby
Ernesto
Florence
Gordon
Helene
Isaac
Joyce
Kirk
Leslie
Michael
Nadine
Oscar
Patty
Rafael
Sandy
Tony
Valerie
William
2008
Barry
Chantal
Dean
Erin
Felix
Gabrielle
Humberto
Ingrid
Jerry
Karen
Lorenzo
Melissa
Noel
Olga
Pablo
Rebekah
Sebastien
Tanya
Van
Wendy
2009
Aurthur
Bertha
Cristobal
Dolly
Edouard
Fay
Gustav
Hanna
Ike
Josephine
Kyle
Laura
Marco
Nana
Omar
Paloma
Rene
Sally
Teddy
Vicky
Wilfred
2010
Ana
Bill
Claudette
Danny
Erika
Fred
Grace
Henri
Ida
Joaquin
Kate
Larry
Mindy
Nicholas
Odette
Peter
Rose
Sam
Teresa
Victor
Wanda
2011
Alex
Bonnie
Colin
Danielle
Earl
Fiona
Gaston
Hermine
Igor
Julia
Karl
Lisa
Matthew
Nicole
Otto
Paula
Richard
Shary
Tomas
Virginie
Walter
2012
Arlene
Bret
Cindy
Don
Emily
Franklin
Gert
Harvey
Irene
Jose
Katia
Lee
Maria
Nate
Ophelia
Philippe
Rina
Sean
Tammy
Vince
Whitney

Experience shows that the use of short, distinctive given names in written as well as spoken communications is quicker and less subject to error than the older more cumbersome latitude-longitude identification methods. These advantages are especially important in exchanging detailed storm information between hundreds of widely scattered stations, coastal bases, and ships at sea.

Since 1953, Atlantic tropical storms have been named from lists originated by the National Hurricane Center. They are now maintained and updated by an international committee of the World Meteorological Organization. The original name lists featured only women's names. In 1979, men's names were introduced and they alternate with the women's names. Six lists are used in rotation. Thus, the 2005 list will be used again in 2011. Here is more information about the history of naming hurricanes.

The only time that there is a change in the list is if a storm is so deadly or costly that the future use of its name on a different storm would be inappropriate for reasons of sensitivity. If that occurs, then at an annual meeting by the WMO committee (called primarily to discuss many other issues) the offending name is stricken from the list and another name is selected to replace it.

Several names have been changed since the lists were created. For example, on the 2004 list (which will be used again in 2010), Gaston has replaced Georges and Matthew has replaced Mitch. On the 2006 list, Kirk has replaced Keith. Here is more information about retired hurricane names.

In the event that more than 21 named tropical cyclones occur in the Atlantic basin in a season, additional storms will take names from the Greek alphabet: Alpha, Beta, Gamma, Delta, and so on. If a storm forms in the off-season, it will take the next name in the list based on the current calendar date. For example, if a tropical cyclone formed on December 28th, it would take the name from the previous season's list of names. If a storm formed in February, it would be named from the subsequent season's list of names.

Eastern North Pacific Names
2006 2007 2008 2009 2010 2011
Aletta
Bud
Carlotta
Daniel
Emilia
Fabio
Gilma
Hector
Ileana
John
Kristy
Lane
Miriam
Norman
Olivia
Paul
Rosa
Sergio
Tara
Vicente
Willa
Xavier
Yolanda
Zeke Alvin
Barbara
Cosme
Dalila
Erick
Flossie
Gil
Henriette
Ivo
Juliette
Kiko
Lorena
Manuel
Narda
Octave
Priscilla
Raymond
Sonia
Tico
Velma
Wallis
Xina
York
Zelda Alma
Boris
Cristina
Douglas
Elida
Fausto
Genevieve
Hernan
Iselle
Julio
Karina
Lowell
Marie
Norbert
Odile
Polo
Rachel
Simon
Trudy
Vance
Winnie
Xavier
Yolanda
Zeke Andres
Blanca
Carlos
Dolores
Enrique
Felicia
Guillermo
Hilda
Ignacio
Jimena
Kevin
Linda
Marty
Nora
Olaf
Patricia
Rick
Sandra
Terry
Vivian
Waldo
Xina
York
Zelda Agatha
Blas
Celia
Darby
Estelle
Frank
Georgette
Howard
Isis
Javier
Kay
Lester
Madeline
Newton
Orlene
Paine
Roslyn
Seymour
Tina
Virgil
Winifred
Xavier
Yolanda
Zeke Adrian
Beatriz
Calvin
Dora
Eugene
Fernanda
Greg
Hilary
Irwin
Jova
Kenneth
Lidia
Max
Norma
Otis
Pilar
Ramon
Selma
Todd
Veronica
Wiley
Xina
York
Zelda

These lists are also re-cycled every six years (the 2005 list will be used again in 2011).

I guess I'm Cornish...:unsure:
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16-06-2006, 09:52 AM
Post: #6
and here comes Alberto...
WOW!
Hey Msgirl...thank you for that.Now that is what I call an answer!
:-)
Much appreciated.....
Some of those names are fantastic...'Hurrican Van'......
I must remember that.........

'Come away, oh human child, to the waters and the wild.With a fairy hand in hand...for the world is more full of weeping than you will understand.........'
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17-06-2006, 03:58 AM
Post: #7
and here comes Alberto...
Well, it's a unique experience to go through and I went through Camille in 1969, I was 4, and several pretty goods ones over the years. I remember I started a thread and got a lot of negative posts concerning Katrina. I'm all for info and google is my friend!!:laugh: I think if you understand the 'up in the air' situation of all of the storms that come into the Gulf of Mexico and the reluctance of people to evacuate b/c of looting or the storm swerving at the last minute, then you can better understand the somewhat laid back attitude some folks have about leaving. Katrina was a political mess from the get-go, and there is blame to spread far and wide, but none-the-less, people died, people lost their whole way of lives, people lost personal items that can't be replaced and so many other sub-tragedies, that to be condescending about it is very unfair. Just my say-so. I'm ashamed of the officials that didn't heed their responsibilities and I'm ashamed of the people who chose to act very stupid and take to lawlessness in the face of the tragedy, but for the people that did leave and the ones that tried or wanted to and couldn't, compassion must be at least considered. Didn't mean to get on a soap-box...just reading a book concerning Camille and waiting on one from the library re: Katrina that I read an excerpt of. Will add more info later!!:nerd: :laugh:

I guess I'm Cornish...:unsure:
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19-06-2006, 10:40 PM
Post: #8
and here comes Alberto...
Ooooh the Atlantic coast 2007 first one sounds a meany!:w00t:

Great post though Msgirl.
I know what you mean about people not wanting to evacuate.
When I was in Ft Lauderdale, we had to evacuate the hospital to further inland and basically from the intracoastal to the beach also had to be evacuated and then they lifted the bridges.

There was loads of people who didn't move anywhere, so once the bridges were up they couldn't go anywhere.
Luckily enough though, the ones I went through didn't hit us.

Oh and by the way, did Alberto make landfall?

[Image: 429.gif]
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22-06-2006, 11:17 AM
Post: #9
and here comes Alberto...
This is a snap shot of Hurricane Bonnie from a couple years back...I always knew Bonsai was a bit of a wind bag but really!

[Image: BonnieCloseup_md.jpg]

[Image: animated_shark184f200.gif] [Image: AniDive.gif][FONT="Comic Sans MS"][SIZE="5"]Eeek! [/SIZE][/FONT][Image: yachtsink.gif] [SIZE="5"][FONT="Comic Sans MS"]Don't panic...I'll save you...oh dear![/FONT] [/SIZE]
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22-06-2006, 11:50 AM
Post: #10
and here comes Alberto...
ooh what is that sinister 'S' type symbol there in the eye of the storm???
The sign of the Devil....
woooooooooooooooooooooo:ghost:

'Come away, oh human child, to the waters and the wild.With a fairy hand in hand...for the world is more full of weeping than you will understand.........'
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